HomeMemberlistUsergroupsSearchRegisterLog inFAQAnnouncementCalendar
Current Time

Announcement
Latest topics
» : “MAYOR JENNY A. BARZAGA 2nd Table Tennis Cup 2011"
by cleamaes Tue Jan 31, 2012 4:20 pm

» 4Videosoft DVD to ipad suite helps you to rip DVD rapidly
by skygirl Sat Nov 26, 2011 11:42 pm

» Real estate market paralyzed as giants fall into insolvency
by mrthought Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:54 pm

» Vietnam office rents to fall 7% in 2012, Jones Lang Lasalle says
by mrthought Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:53 pm

» Vietnam Struggles to Attract Foreign Property Investment
by mrthought Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:52 pm

Poll
What brand of blade do you use ?
Butterfly
41%
 41% [ 18 ]
Stiga
18%
 18% [ 8 ]
DHS
5%
 5% [ 2 ]
Donic
14%
 14% [ 6 ]
Yasaka
7%
 7% [ 3 ]
729 Friendship
7%
 7% [ 3 ]
JOOLA
2%
 2% [ 1 ]
Killerspin
2%
 2% [ 1 ]
Andro
2%
 2% [ 1 ]
Xiom
2%
 2% [ 1 ]
Total Votes : 44
Affiliates
free forum
 

Share | 
 

 Classification of Serbo-Croatian

Go down 
AuthorMessage
gaunpro



Male
Number of posts : 36
Location : fgdasfsads
Member of : adsadsa
Registration date : 2010-11-02

PostSubject: Classification of Serbo-Croatian    Sat Nov 06, 2010 1:09 am

Background: Classification of Serbo-Croatian


Serbian is derived from the Slavic branch of the Indo-German languages. Within this, it is attributed to the south Slavic languages. Serbian is spoken as the mother tongue by more than 8 million people. Serbs live primarily in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Serbian has been chosen as the national official language in these states. Over and above this, Serbs live as a minority in Croatia (above all, in the regions of the earlier military border) and are also a minority since recently in Slovenia and Macedonia.

Both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets are used in Serbian. As a matter of fact, the Cyrillic font has been fixed in the Serbian state for official use, but, however, both fonts are used in day-to-day applications. Thus, for example, religious or traditional pieces of text and official documents have been created primarily with the Cyrillic font, whereas the Latin font is used more extensively in business correspondence, the Boulevard Press and also in the printing of books.

Serbo-Croatian was the official national language in former Yugoslavia until the time of its disintegration at the beginning of the 90's in the 20th century. In fact, in communist Yugoslavia, in the initial years after 1945, Serbian and Croatian were recognised as two independent languages, so that at that time there were four official languages coexisting in Yugoslavia (Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian and Macedonian), Hungarian translators but, however, the official political line changed in the years to follow. In 1954, a uniform language was fixed for Croats, Serbs, Bosnians, Herzegovinians and Montenegrins – Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian. The Government tolerated merely the differences in the pronunciation and the use of the two different alphabets (Cyrillic and Latin). Thereafter, Serbian was usually called the eastern and Croatian the western variant of Serbo-Croatian. In contrast, Slovenian and Macedonian retained their official status as independent languages.

network monitoring
silver cufflinks
With the break-up of Yugoslavia, even its languages separated, and Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian and Montenegrin are considered to be autonomous languages since then. The term "Serbo-Croatian" is barely used in the former Serbo-Croatian speaking countries.

Back to top Go down
View user profile
heroisthai



Male
Number of posts : 15
Location : ??
Member of : ??
Registration date : 2010-11-22

PostSubject: Re: Classification of Serbo-Croatian    Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:38 pm

Both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets are used in Serbian. As a matter of fact, the Cyrillic font has been fixed in the Serbian state for official use, but, however, both fonts are used in day-to-day applications. Thus, for example, religious or traditional pieces of text and official documents have been created primarily with the Cyrillic font, whereas the Latin font is used more extensively in business correspondence, the Boulevard Press and also in the printing of books.


Back to top Go down
View user profile
 
Classification of Serbo-Croatian
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» NHIAA makes big classification change
» Top Sprinters get a 'bye' in Olympic 100m
» How OFSAA qualification works in each region
» Tomic v. Djokovic, the teacher v. the puil, great article from the Daily Mail
» Other OFSAA news: classifications and FIBA

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Vernlen Table Tennis & Chess Club :: All About Chess ::   :: History of Chess-
Jump to: